+

AAFF

The Asian American Federation of Florida (AAFF) is a 501(c)(3) coalition that aims to unity and collaboration among the various Asian Pacific American organizations and to improve the relationship of a culturally diverse Asian Pacific American community in Florida. The AAFF is a statewide organization made up of more than 70 Bangladesh, Burmese, Cambodian, Chinese, Filipino, Indian, Iranian, Korean, Laotian, Taiwanese, Thai, Turkish and Vietnamese community-based organizations, businesses and media.

 

 

 

 

May 2013

NEW AMERICANS IN FLORIDA:

The Political and Economic Power of Immigrants, Latinos, and Asians in the Sunshine State

There are few states where the growing political and economic clout of immigrants, children of immigrants, and Latinos is as apparent as Florida. Immigrants (the foreign-born) account for nearly 1 in 5 Floridians, and roughly half of them are U.S. citizens who are eligible to vote. Latinos comprised 1 in 7 of the state’s voters in the 2008 elections, while immigrants and their children were nearly 1 in 5 of the state’s registered voters as of 2008. Immigrants not only contribute to the state’s economy as workers, but also account for billions of dollars in tax revenue and consumer purchasing power. Moreover, Latinos and Asians (both foreign-born and native-born) wield $143.1 billion in consumer purchasing power, and the businesses they own had sales and receipts of nearly $90 billion and employed more than 400,000 people at last count. At a time when the economy is still recovering, Florida can ill-afford to alienate such a critical component of its labor force, tax base, and business community.

 

Immigrants and their children are a large and growing share of Florida’s electorate.  

Immigrant workers and taxpayers are integral to Florida’s economy.

Florida’s immigrant workers contribute an estimated $20 billion to the state in taxes each year, according to a 2007 study by Florida International University: 20

 Immigrants comprised 24.7% of the state’s workforce in 2011 (or 2,295,252 workers), according to the U.S. Census Bureau.22

 Unauthorized immigrants comprised 6.6% of the state’s workforce (or 600,000 workers) in  2010, according to a report by the Pew Hispanic Center.23

Immigrants accounted for 38% of total economic output in the Miami metropolitan area and 13% of total economic output in the Tampa metropolitan area as of 2007, according to a study by the Fiscal Policy Institute.24

If all unauthorized immigrants were removed from Florida, the state would lose $43.9 billion in economic activity, $19.5 billion in gross state product, and approximately 262,436 jobs, even accounting for adequate market adjustment time, according to a report by the Perryman Group.25

 

Latino and Asian consumers and business owners are integral to Florida’s economy.

 

Immigrants are integral to Florida’s economy as students.

 Y Florida’s 32,567 foreign students contributed $935.7 million to the state’s economy in tuition, fees, and living expenses for the 2011-2012 academic year, according to NAFSA: Association of International Educators.29

 

Naturalized citizens excel educationally.

 

  • In Florida, 27.3% of foreign-born persons who were naturalized U.S. citizens in 2011 had a bachelor’s or higher degree, compared to 19.8% of noncitizens. At the same time, only 19.2% of naturalized citizens lacked a high-school diploma, compared to 30.7% of noncitizens.30
  • The number of immigrants in Florida with a college degree increased by 70.7% between 2000 and 2011, according to data from the Migration Policy Institute.31
  •  In  Florida,  86.8%  of  children  with  immigrant  parents  were  considered  “English proficient” as of 2009, according to the Urban Institute.32
  •  The English proficiency rate among Asian children in Florida was 90.8%, while for Latino children it was 85.7%, as of 2009.33


1 U.S. Census Bureau, The Foreign-Born Population: 2000, December 2003.
2 Ibid.
3 2011 American Community Survey (1-Year Estimates).
4 Ibid.
5 Ibid.
6 Ibid.
7 U.S. Census Bureau, The Foreign-Born Population: 2000, December 2003
8 Jeffrey S. Passel and D’Vera Cohn, Unauthorized Immigrant Population: National and State Trends, 2010 (Washington, DC: Pew Hispanic Center, February 1, 2011), p. 24.
9 Rob Paral and Associates, The New American Electorate: The Growing Political Power of Immigrants and Their Children
(Washington, DC: Immigration Policy Center, American Immigration Law Foundation, October 2010).
10 U.S. Census Bureau, The Hispanic Population: 2000, May 2001.
11 Ibid.
12 2011 American Community Survey (1-Year Estimates).
13 U.S. Census Bureau, The Asian Population: 2000, February 2002.
14 Ibid.
15 2011 American Community Survey (1-Year Estimates).
16 2008 Current Population Survey, Table 4b: Reported Voting and Registration of the Voting-Age Population, by Sex, Race and Hispanic Origin, for States: November 2008.
17 U.S. Electoral College, 2008 Presidential Election: Popular Vote Totals.
18 The Urban Institute, data from the Integrated Public Use Microdata Series datasets drawn from the 2005 - 2009 American Community Survey.
19 Ibid.
20 Emily Eisenhauer, et al., Immigrants in Florida: Characteristics and Contributions (Miami, FL: Research Institute for Social and Economic Policy of the Center for Labor Research and Studies, Florida International University: May 21, 2007)
21 The Immigration Policy Center, Unauthorized Immigrants Pay Taxes, Too (Washington, DC: April 2011).
22 2011 American Community Survey (1-Year Estimates).
23 Jeffrey S. Passel and D’Vera Cohn, Unauthorized Immigrant Population: National and State Trends, 2010 (Washington, DC: Pew Hispanic Center, February 1, 2011), p. 25.
24 David Dyssegaard Kallick, Immigrants in the Economy: Contribution of Immigrant Workers to the Country’s 25 LargestMetropolitan Areas (New York, NY: Fiscal Policy Institute, December 2009), p. 11.

25 The Perryman Group, An Essential Resource: An Analysis of the Economic Impact of Undocumented Workers on BusinessActivity in the US with Estimated Effects by State and by Industry (Waco, TX: April 2008).
26 Jeffrey M. Humphreys, The Multicultural Economy 2012 (Athens, GA: Selig Center for Economic Growth, University of Georgia, 2012).
27 U.S. Census Bureau, Estimates of Business Ownership by Gender, Ethnicity, Race, and Veteran Status: 2007, June 2011.
28 Ibid.
29 NAFSA: Association of International Educators, The Economic Benefits of International Students to the U.S. Economy:Academic Year 2011-2012 (Washington, DC: 2012).
30 Migration Policy Institute Data Hub, Florida: Language & Education.
31 Ibid.
32 The Urban Institute, data from the Integrated Public Use Microdata Series datasets drawn from the 2005 - 2009 American Community Survey.
33 Ibid.